Tag Archives: I-9 form

June 13, 2016

Repeal of Colorado’s Employment Verification Law

Tsai_RBy Roger Tsai

Effective August 10, 2016, Colorado employers no longer need to complete and maintain the state employment verification affirmation form that ensures that new hires are legally eligible for employment in the United States. Gone too will be the state requirement that employers keep copies of the documents provided by new hires to show their employment eligibility and identity in support of the I-9 verification process. Signed into law by Governor John Hickenlooper on June 8, 2016, House Bill 16-1114 repeals the state statutory provisions that duplicated much of the employment verification requirements of the federal I-9 forms.

Legislature Relieves Extra Burden on Colorado Employers

In repealing most of section 8-2-122 of the Colorado Revised Statutes, the Colorado legislature acknowledged that the additional state employment verification affidavit and documentation requirements imposed an extra, redundant burden on employers while doing nothing to further prevent unauthorized individuals from working in our state. With the repeal of the additional state verification requirements, the fines and penalties for failure to comply with those requirements under state law are repealed as well.

Section 8-2-122 does not go away entirely, however, as the legislature kept the provision that permits the director of the Colorado Division of Labor to request documentation from employers to show they are in compliance with the I-9 employment verification requirements. The director, or his/her designee, still may conduct random audits of employers to ensure compliance with I-9 obligations. The legislature also maintained the public policy statement that this statute is to be enforced in a non-discriminatory fashion.

What Colorado Employers Should Do

For new employees hired in the next two months, before August 10, 2016, continue to comply with the Colorado employment verification requirements as well as your federal I-9 obligations.

For new employees hired on or after August 10, 2016, you need only comply with your federal I-9 employment verification requirements. That means newly hire employees must complete and sign Section 1 of Form I-9 no later than the first day of employment, and employers must complete Section 2 of the I-9 and examine evidence of both identity and employment authorization within three business days of the employee’s first day of employment. Federal law does not require you to keep copies of the documents provided by the employee to show identity and employment authorization, but employers may choose to retain these documents at their discretion in case an federal immigration audit occurs.

What should you do with the Colorado employment verification affirmation forms and copies of authorization document for your current employees after August 10th?  Your best practice is to continue to keep those forms for the duration of each employee’s employment since the forms were required at the time you hired them. Once an employee is no longer employed by your organization, you may dispose of the Colorado-specific affirmation forms but continue to retain the I-9 forms for one year after the date employment ends, or three years after the date of hire, whichever is later.

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October 28, 2013

E-Verify – Catching Up After the Government Shutdown

By Roger Tsai 

The early October shutdown of the federal government left many employers unable to verify employment eligibility through the government’s E-Verify system.  Employees were unable to resolve Tentative Nonconfirmations (TNCs) and deadlines were missed.  What do you do now that the government has reopened?  How do you catch up and remain compliant with your E-Verify obligations?  Here are tips based on information provided by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). 

  • November 5th deadline for creating E-Verify case for employees hired during the shutdown.  If you hired employees during the government shutdown, you need to create an E-Verify case for each such employee no later than November 5, 2013.  If the system asks why the case is late because it was not entered within three days of the hire, select “Other” from the drop-down list and enter “federal government shutdown.” 
  • Initiate referral process now for employees who decided to contest TNC during shutdown.  If an employee decided to contest his or her TNC while the E-Verify system was unavailable, initiate the referral process in E-Verify now.
  • Add 12 business days for employees to resolve TNC.  If an employee had a TNC referred during the period of September 17 – 30, 2013, the deadline for the employee to contact the Social Security Administration or the Department of Homeland Security to resolve their case fell during the government shutdown.  These employees may add 12 federal business days to the date printed on the “Referral Letter” or “Referral Date Confirmation” to resolve their cases. 
  • Start a new case for any Final Nonconfirmations (FNCs) or No Shows that resulted because of the shutdown.  If an employee received a FNC or DHS No Show because of the government shutdown, you will need to close the case and select “The employee continues to work for the employer after receiving a Final Nonconfirmation (or No Show) result.”  Then enter a new case in E-Verify for that employee so that the employee has an opportunity to contest and resolve the TNC that led to the FNC result.
  • I-9 obligation not affected by the government shutdown.  Because I-9 forms do not require government input, I-9 requirements were not affected by the government shutdown.  You should have properly completed and retained a Form I-9 for every employee, even those hired during the shutdown. 

Employees may be confused about what to do with a TNC or FNC that was due to or affected by the government shutdown. Refer them to the Employee section of the E-Verify website or to E-Verify Customer Support.   Remember that employers may not take any adverse action against an employee because of a TNC and should not take any adverse action due to a FNC or No Show result caused by the shutdown.  By catching up with E-Verify obligations now, your employment eligibility compliance procedures should get back to normal within a few weeks.


Disclaimer:This article is designed to provide general information on pertinent legal topics. The statements made are provided for educational purposes only. They do not constitute legal advice and are not intended to create an attorney-client relationship between you and Holland & Hart LLP. If you have specific questions as to the application of the law to your activities, you should seek the advice of your legal counsel.


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